Thursday, May 19, 2005

Obviously

I seem to have finally hit that stage when it's really really obvious to people that I'm pregnant. It's hard to look pregnant in the winter, because I've got my big bear-sized coat on when I go outside and I probably just look blubbery.

For the last couple of days now, when I get on a crowded bus I don't even have to say 'Excuse me, I'm pregnant - can I sit down?'. I might have to excuse myself, but that's it. And yesterday a young guy offered me his seat even without me looking in his direction. It really helps to unbutton my coat and let it all hang out (so to speak).

In the weekend, one of my neighbours whom I don't really know except by sight, walked past me as I retrieved my recycling bin from the footpath. We said 'hi', as neighbours do, but then he carried on and congratulated me on my mother-to-be-ness. This from a guy who usually doesn't say a word to me.

On the other hand, when I'm sitting on a park bench gorging myself on a giant-sized potato-top mince pie, I wonder if people walking past are thinking that I'm eating all the wrong food for a pregnant woman - maybe they're silently lambasting me for not eating home-made salad and hummous.

Today I bought a book called Bestfeeding, recommended to me by my GP. Amazing that something which is supposed to be such a natural thing i.e. breastfeeding, is so un-simple in practice that it takes a team of experts to write hundreds of pages on how to do it properly. How on earth do women in third-world countries manage?

12 comments:

Ms Mac said...

"How on earth do women in third-world countries manage?"

That's a very good point.

Mike said...

Did you do a search on "breastfeeding: and stumble into my blog?
:-)

Rainypete said...

There are way too many books on anything. These same authors could make breathing seem very very complicated. Nature has its way.

happyandblue2 said...

How in the world could you find a book on breastfeeding that's called bestfeeding?
And if there is a book on breathing where can I get a copy..

onscreen said...

Not that I'm an expert of breastfeeding, but from what I've seen, if the baby is hungry, they know what to do!

And as for eating homemade salads and stuff, if I was a baby in someones tummy again, I'd be screeaming 'thanks for the pie, now how about that American hotdog!'

Hhhhmmmm, I sound more and more like a crazy man every day - maybe i watch too many DVDs..... must get out more...

Desiree said...

Speaking as a woman from a third-world country (just kidding, folks!), go for the potato-top pie everytime!

Really the body knows exactly what it wants. S'funny, we were gassing about this very issue only this morning at work. One guy talked about a vegetarian friend who ended up craving steaks while she was pregnant. I've heard of a lady who hated bananas any time other than when she was preggers, when she ate whole trees of bananas...

Violet said...

ms mac: yes it is

miramarmike: no, but I did happen to read your blog post about your tendency to stare at breasfeeding women...

rainypete: maybe you're right, or maybe people in Western society have removed themselves so far from what's "natural" that they need to be taught e.g. that meat comes from living animals and not from vacuum packs.

happyandblue2: if there is, it may be called "Beating".

onscreen: you probably haven't watched enough DVDs if you haven't yet come across any about how to breastfeed ;-)

Desiree: well I've been craving sugar, but then I always crave sugar even though I don't actually suffer from a lack of it. I also crave cream cheese, sushi and deli meats, because I can't have any. And that's where your theory falls over.

Frally said...

Yeah, I don't know how they manage either! BEcause I also assumed that something so natural would just happen...when it didn't, I was very disheartened. It took one of those books by an expert ("the Natural Way To Better Breastfeeding" if you're interested) to turn it all around for me. Actually, if I get serious for a minute, I think the reason they succeed in third world countries is because they have stronger networks of women around to help them (mothers, aunts, sisters etc), their own personal "experts". ;)

darth said...

gorge away! potato topped mince pie sounds great right now...

and mrs. darth was shocked when people didn't stand up and offer a seat on the train, even when she was obviously showing...it was amazing how many people "suddenly" fell fast asleep in their seats when she got on :lol:

Violet said...

frally: you're probably right - extended families and all.

darth: it's almost as though people think it's uncool to take an interest in the bus-welfare of pregnant women and old people, eh?

cesca said...

I'm with Frally on this one. The support network, plus not any other choice!

I assumed breastfeeding would be a piece of piss (i.e. easy). It hurt more than giving birth, until I finally got it right, after about 8 weeks of living hell. (And it took MY MOTHER to tell me what I was doing wrong - what were we saying about the third world country thing again?).

:-)

Violet said...

It hurt worse than giving birth!?
And I'll bet there're no breast equivalents of an epidural either. However, asking my mother probably wouldnt help, because not only did she not breastfeed me for long but it was a heck of a long time ago and she wouldn't remember.